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8 Ways Being Mindful Can Reduce Anxiety

You’re reading 8 Ways Being Mindful Can Reduce Anxiety, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you’re enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

Mindful thinking is a savior; it helps you realize that no scenario or circumstance is hard to overcome if you truly are in control of your own mind and actions. How can being mindful help with reducing anxiety and in turn, increase your self-growth? Let’s take a look: If you are looking to become independent without being affected by anxiety too much then you need to take a look at the following infographic which can help you take control of your life. Rising Levels of Anxiety In A Digital World Additionally, here a few quick and actionable tips that can also help you get more out of your life. Being patient Good things come with time, and also with a lot of patience. Impatience can often be the enemy that drives you crazy and stresses you out. As we all know, life doesn’t always work in our favor. Sometimes, waiting for the right moment and right opportunity is a better way to deal with things. Impatience makes you anxious and keeps you on the edge. When you’ve mastered the art of being patient and resilient, you will notice how things are falling into place smoothly.  Being open minded When you become open to change and learn to accept different perspectives for the same situation, you also get to see and analyze many possible outcomes. Especially in times of contingency, it’s very important to be open-minded, to avoid feeling overwhelmed or stressed out. Stress is sometimes the main cause for anxiety to start acting up, which results in the mind shutting down and struggling to make logical decisions. Keep an open mind and watch how things just flow, without too much effort. Being conscious, always How essential is it to be conscious at all times? What does being aware and alert do for a person? The answer is simple; when you are self-conscious and aware, at least as much as your mind allows you to be, you’re cutting down the margin for unnecessary errors and also helping yourself grow as an individual. Someone who is conscious, not just physically but also mentally, is someone who can deal with any scenario that comes his/her way and does not need to struggle or ramble through problems. A solution is easier to find when your mind is aware of what its goal is. Being self-critical Before taking into consideration any judgment that might come from a third person, learn to be your own judge. When you are critical of your decisions and any possible mistakes you’ve made, instead of looking at the negative side of it, you learn to make the most of it. Who understands you better than yourself? No one. Our well-wishers and loved ones will always advise us, advise that we must definitely keep in mind, but when you are your own judge and critic, the path looks a lot more clear. Being self-loving Love yourself, at all times and in all situations. Why is this so important? Why is self-love advocated in such abundance? Good things always begin from within. When you love yourself, there is no void you have to fill, no space that needs to be covered up. You never have the sense of feeling incomplete or alone, and this is what will get you through the toughest times. The fear of being alone, of not being enough, of being left out or alienated; all these fears lead to bouts of anxiety, which in turn damages you as a person and directly affects your self-confidence. Being independent The importance of independent living and thinking cannot be stressed on enough. An independent person is self-sufficient, self-reliant and is more than capable of dealing with him/herself, without feeling the need to depend on anyone else. It’s not a bad thing to seek assistance from those who are willing to give it to us, but when you are confident that despite any circumstance you will always be strong enough to take yourself through, there is no fear and there are no inhibitions. Being positive When you are an optimistic thinker, you can help but notice the better things in life. Through hard and trying times, you learn to master the art of staying happy, of smiling through a storm and becoming a warrior on your own. Positive thinking is only the beginning of a more content and fulfilled life. A positive thinker will deal with his anxiety in an optimistic manner; he/she won’t run away from it or develop a phobia but try to find a solution and embrace the ups and downs that come with it. Being driven Ambition is what keeps us going, no matter how old we are. When you have a goal and an aim, despite any amount of failures and setbacks, you are still driven to keep moving forward and not give up too easily. Giving up on anything ultimately results in giving up on yourself. When you believe in yourself, you are always motivated to not stop until you have achieved what you want most. When you’ve made up your mind to take your life into your own hands and not let opportunities and chances slip away, you’ve won half the battle of dealing with anxiety. Limitations are only challenges that help you grow, if you can learn to look past the obstacles.

You’ve read 8 Ways Being Mindful Can Reduce Anxiety, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you’ve enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

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About Darren Webb

Hello & Welcome to my blog. My name is Darren Webb and i'm on a magical successful journey and also helping others have a more stress free relaxed life. I truly hope that you find a lot of useful information on my blog and that it helps you through your life. Please feel free to contact me at any time.

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You're reading How Exercise Can Boost your Mental Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

In an age where pharmaceutical drugs dominate television advertisements (the average US television viewer sees nine pharmaceutical ads per day (C. Lee Ventola, 2011)), it’s not surprising that the overwhelming majority of the population are looking for quick fixes to often complex problems. After all, there’s a pill for almost anything these days. But one of the most time-tested and effective mental health boosters is completely under-utilized and under-prescribed – exercise.

The Connection Between Exercise and Mental Health

Do a simple Pubmed search on the link between exercise and mental health, and you’ll find more relevant articles than you can count. Coincidence? No way. Researchers as far back as the 1930’s identified strong relationships between amounts and types of physical exercise used in treatments, and the positive mental effects they had on those patients (Davis, 1930). Since then, countless studies have been performed, and the results have been overwhelmingly positive. A comprehensive study from 1985 found that “physical activity and exercise probably alleviate some symptoms associated with mild to moderate depression. The evidence also suggests that physical activity and exercise might provide a beneficial adjunct for alcoholism and substance abuse programs; improve self-image, social skills, and cognitive functioning; reduce the symptoms of anxiety…” (Taylor, 1985). These benefits are known worldwide as well, with groups such as Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) stating that “Exercise appears most effective for depressive disorders and may also improve mental well-being and physical health in individuals with serious mental disorders” (Morgan, 2013); while a Chinese study from 1997 on college and middle-school students found that “physical exercises were helpful to reduce students' tension, anger, fatigue, depression and confusion, and improve their vigor and self-esteem” (Biyan, 1997) . These are just a few of what are thousands of reports of the positive effects of physical exercise on mental health. The relationship is not limited by nationality, age or time-period – it’s abundantly clear that physical exercise boosts mental health.

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So why, with all the knowledge we have on this physical-mental link, do we still first reach for the anti-depressant pills, and not our running shoes?  The answers are beyond the scope of this article, but most certainly include the billions of dollars of annual advertising spent by Big Pharma; our ever-increasing need for instant gratification; and (perhaps most unfortunately), our ever-increasing lethargy underpinned by our growing worldwide obesity rates. So, where to from here?

Re-Connecting

The first step towards using exercise as an adjunct to an overall healthy mental state is to acknowledge that there is a clear link between exercise and mental health, and that you are responsible for self-medicating with the powerful drug of movement. At its’ most basic level – getting up and moving around will give you a more positive outlook on life, and moderate some symptoms of depression, anxiety, addiction and cognitive impairment. So, just get up and move.

Taking this to another level, if you want to make a significant and lasting change by using exercise to improve your mental health, there are countless websites dedicated to helping individuals improve their physical health. Many of these are free, and provide detailed workouts, meal plans, tracking tools and guidance to help you stay on track.

Here are some quick and easy recommendations to get you started:

Walk More

No matter how busy you are, there are quick and easy ways you can get more movement in to your daily routine. Set a timer every hour to get out of your chair and walk around the office or your home. Try parking another hundred yards from your workplace or the store. Walk your children to school if time and distance permits. Get a pedometer or activity tracker and try to reach a goal of 10,000 steps per day. If your fitness level is low, don’t get hung up on numbers – just try to move around more!

Lift More

Resistance training is one of the most beneficial physical exercises a human being can do – particularly one that utilizes multiple muscle groups and body parts. When most people think of weight training, they picture powerlifters or bodybuilders moving huge weights around a gym, but in reality, any resistance to your body can make a positive impact on not only your mental health, but your physical health as well. For beginners, air squats, push-ups against a wall and lying leg lifts might be enough to get excellent results. For the more physically-experienced, a weight-training regimen of three to five days per week alternating muscle groups will be more effective.

Join a Class

One of the best ways to continue with physical exercise is to be accountable to a group - whether at a gym, social club or even with work or family members. A great way to achieve this is to join an organized fitness class – it could be aerobics, swim, senior fitness, CrossFit or anything in between. The important thing here is that you get some level of physical exertion.

What to Expect

In the world of instant gratification that we seem to be a part of, it’s unrealistic to expect that walking a few minutes a day will alleviate all your mental health concerns. In that same vain, please don’t take this article as a prescription to drop your medication, counseling, dieting or other treatments and just do some form of physical exercise. What we’re encouraging here, is adding some level of physical exertion to your daily routine as a supplement to your treatments. The goal is most certainly to be symptom and treatment-free, but don’t expect exercise to be your cure-all. Here are some things you can expect, and in a fairly short period of time:

- Improved mental clarity
- Higher self-esteem levels
- Improved cardiovascular capacity
- More restful sleep at night
- Lower anxiety levels
- A better sense of purpose

These should be the goals of anyone looking to improve their mental health, and with decades of published research on the topic, it seems to be a no-brainer that you should incorporate some physical exercise in your daily routine.

 


James Anthony is the manager of Protein King – an online fitness, health, supplement and apparel store dedicated to improving the lives of everyday people. Based in Australia, James writes extensively on the topics of diet, nutrition, sports supplements and fitness, and in his time working with Protein King, has been rewarded with many inspiring stories of change and empowerment.

References

Biyan et al. (1997). The Mental Health of College and Middle-School Students in Shanghai And Its Relationship With Physical Exercises. Psychological Science, 1.

  1. Lee Ventola, M. (2011, Oct). Direct-to-Consumer Pharmaceutical Advertising: Therapeutic or Toxic? Pharmacy and Therapeutics, 36(10), 669-674; 681-684.

Davis, J. E. (1930, August). Mental Health Objectives in Physical Education. Occupational Therapy & Rehabilitation, 9(4), 231-238.

Morgan et al. (2013, August). Exercise and Mental Health: An Exercise and Sports Science Australia Commissioned Review. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online, 16(4), 64-73.

Taylor et al. (1985, March-April). The Relation of Physical Activity and Exercise to Mental Health. Public Health Reports, 195-202.

You've read How Exercise Can Boost your Mental Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

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You've read To Achieve Your Dreams, Overcome These 5 Enemies, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

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